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"Bryn" - Collie with Polypoid Cystitis


Photo: Bryn
Bryn

 

Cystitis (bladder inflammation) is a very common complaint both in human and veterinary medicine. It can be both frustrating to treat and very uncomfortable to experience.

Empirical treatment with antibiotics is generally advised on the basis of treating an opportunistic infection - usually bacteria more commonly found in the large bowel.

The large majority of these patients present because their owners have either noticed discomfort when trying to pass urine or occassionally spots of blood are apparent. Such was the case with Bryn who went on to receive a course of antibiotics to help his body rid itself of the suspected infection.

 

However after 2 weeks the presenting symptoms of blood in the urine (haematuria) had not resolved and Bryn was scheduled for further investigation. Special imaging techniques (double contrast cystography and ultrasonography) were used to highlight any abnormalities in the bladder.

Since the special dye did not outline the bladder wall smoothly it was clear that there were irregularities present. At first bladder stones or possibly cancer was thought to be the problem however a biopsy of the affected tissue confirmed the presence of polyps.

Polypoid cystitis is a rare form of cystitis where inflamed nodules of bladder lining protrude into the lumen forming polyps. These are thought to be formed by a longstanding source of irritiation which in this instance proved to be a rather nasty type of E. Coli bacterium. Further lab tests identified a more appropriate antibiotic to help Bryn clear the problem.

Bryn is now well on the road to recovery and it is hoped that once the infection is controlled the polyps will finally resolve and he will once again experience that great sense of relief that comes with expressing your bladder free of any discomfort! Aaaaaaahhhhh!

 

Terry Dunne BVMS, Cert SAO, MRCVS

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