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"Dylan" - Bichon Frise with Skin Disease

photo of Dylan

Dylan

Dylan's scar

Dylan went to another veterinary practice back in October of last year (2004) for a routine procedure. Unfortunately, within a day or two of being sent home he began to develop a horribly, suppurative, discharging skin condition.

Despite frequent visits over the following 6 weeks to the original practice the condition continued to deteriorate and spread over his back. So alarmed by it's appearance were Dylan's owners that they recorded its progress on film!

Finally, in December, Dylan and his owner armed with their photographs decided he would come and seek our counsel. To say I was surprised by Dylan's appearance would be a little understated and I'm afraid that the photographs are too x-rated to warrant inclusion on a family website!

I have to concede that my first thought was that we may be dealing with the much publicised MRSA or "super bug". This bacterial organism has been much debated in the medical profession and it's prevalence has been associated with poor hygiene and the innappropriate use of antibiotics. Fortunately, so far there have been very few reports in the veterinary press.

Since Dylan's disease related to his skin I conferred with my colleague Ingrid who has recently been awarded an advanced qualification in dermatology (skin disease).

Whilst she too raised her eyebrows at the apearance of Dylan's plight she advised an aggressive treatment approach with cephalosporins (antibiotic). Luckily for Dylan, who is beginning to tire of his own photogenic appeal, the improvement has been swift. Within 2 weeks the skin had dried and the discomfort had gone. We are only waiting now for his quiff to return!

Terry Dunne BVMS, Cert SAO, MRCVS

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